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Dignity Serves: Train the Trainer

This training is for those who have completed the regular Dignity Serves Training and are wanting to be certified to train others. Participants are provided with the Leader’s Guide that has additional information on each of the principles and how to guide others to come to their own conclusions and applications by exposure to the materials in the proper setting. This is the art of facilitation and this new skill can be applied in a variety of contexts.

Dignity Serves teaches a powerful new paradigm of service called ‘dignified interdependence.’ Taught from a Christian perspective, this 6 lesson study will give you a useful toolkit to apply in all areas of your life – home, office, church, and neighborhood.

Saturday, April 21st, from 2pm to 5pm. Attendees must have completed Dignity Serves prior to attending. There is a full training immediately before this Train the Trainer session if you would like to do both in one weekend (https://www.eventbrite.com/e/dignity-serves-a-workshop-on-helping-others-tickets-44149878475?aff=es2).

Cost: $99

Led by Phil Hissom.

All training materials will be provided. There will also be snacks throughout the training and lunch on Saturday.

REGISTER BELOW

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Dignity Serves: A Workshop on Helping Others

Want to learn how to better help people in your life? Dignity Serves teaches a powerful new paradigm of service called ‘dignified interdependence.’ Taught from a Christian perspective, this 6 lesson study will give you a useful toolkit to apply in all areas of your life – home, office, church, and neighborhood. Want to experience less guilt and frustration trying to help people? This training is for you. It has helped thousands of people since it first hit the scene in 2008. Join us.

Check out this video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IKQiJTL_OYM

Friday, April 20th from 6pm to 9pm and Saturday, April 21st, from 8:30am to 2pm. Attendees must attend all sessions.

Cost: $50

Led by Phil Hissom.

All training materials will be provided. There will also be snacks throughout the training and lunch on Saturday.

REGISTER BELOW

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Curb Cutting: How Solving Problems for One Group Helps us All

The Polis Institute is a non-profit organization that aims to remove the barriers that prevent experiencing long, healthy, fruitful and dignified lives. Many of these barriers stem from concentrated poverty, but there are additional barriers, both physical and metaphoric, that manifest in a variety of ways. We at POLIS use and develop research around the best practical ways to engage with people living in areas of high distress, and help design long-term solutions for the well-being of their community.

Approaching global systemic issues very locally, over a long range of time, is not a popular model in our fast-paced, instant gratification society. But taking time to get to know people, and deeply considering their expressed desires and visions of what could be, can be effective on a grander scale than imagined.

Conventionally, city sidewalks and city streets met at the right angle of a curb. No harm in that, right? You just step on and off. However, for Edward Roberts, confined to a wheelchair and iron lung after contracting polio, that six inch curb was a major hurdle. As a student at UC Berkeley in the 1960s, he became a disability rights activist, and led a movement to create curb cuts, or ramps, to allow sidewalk access to people with wheelchairs. Curb cuts had existed since the 1940s when they were created to assist disabled WWII vets, but were not in common use or well known until Roberts and his classmates worked to design solutions for a local, small, underserved group of people with limited mobility.

With decades of effort, and the benefit of national attention to the accomplishments of this growing movement, the 1990 ADA (Americans with Disabilities Act) was passed, mandating curb cuts everywhere – removing barriers to wheelchair access to city sidewalks and the cities themselves.

My point, however is not that a small group won a victory that serves them alone. It is that a much larger and unanticipated group of people also benefitted from the well-designed solution of curb cuts. Anyone pushing a baby stroller or a grocery cart, riding a skateboard or bicycle, can use a curb cut. Curb cuts help call attention to an intersection’s crosswalk which increases pedestrian safety, are easier to shovel clear in the snow, and are more navigable for the very young and old. When people concentrate their efforts in assisting the overlooked, and solving just a single problem, it can open a whole new world of opportunities for all of society. The Polis Institute desires to be an Ed Roberts in the world, who in slowly serving and designing solutions for the one, would benefit the many in cities across the United States and the world.